Spring Green Roses

1954 Simplicity 4282 in floral print cotton

1954 Simplicity 4282 in floral print cotton

I made another dress – this time I made one in my size!  I don’t wear dresses in my normal everyday life, but this is so cute I may change my mind!  Unfortunately I still have ongoing computer issues with my own set-up, so this is another post without the proper start.  I have, however, found a copy on Etsy for you, so you can see the sketch & drawn details.  Simplicity 4282 is for a sundress with optional huge pockets and a short sleeve bolero.  I had intended to make the bolero too, I even found the most perfect matching colour in a gorgeous linen.  But – being unused to inches and yards, I miscalculated and bought too little.  Never mind, it wasn’t to be, so maybe that means there is another “perfect” piece of fabric out there still, just waiting for me to come along & turn it into the bolero for this dress.

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The skirt is made of 4 front panels & 4 back panels, with a side zip on the left.  This particular fabric fails the sun-test spectacularly, so it’s lined with cotton lawn.  I love the curved neckline on the bodice, it could so easily have been a boring straight line, but that curve makes it so much more feminine.  The whole bodice is topstitched & to carry that through, I elected to use a welt seam finish on the skirt panels.  I quite like the way it’s turned out, especially with the extra layer of the cotton lining underneath.

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Now this is one dress I might just make again for myself to keep.  But I’d need to make some fitting adjustments first!  I was chuffed that the 42Bust fitted me at all, so a small adjustment for next time seems perfectly acceptable.  This version though, will be going into my online shop.

DSC07898-1I do wish my photographer had noticed I always had my hands on my hips for these pictures.  It makes it hard to find something new to sho.!  One thing you will notice – I haven’t handstitched the hem!!  I know, it’s a sacrilege!  I figured that with all that topstitching going on, a machined hem would fit right in.  I mean, it’s not like their machines couldn’t do it…

Do you do any “modern” finish on your vintage makes?

Going in Circles

1960s Butterick 4360 in linen & cotton

1960s Butterick 4360 in linen & cotton

I’ve had some pretty annoying computer problems this week, which do not look like being resolved for a while, so apologies for the lack of posts, and for not posting the promised tutorial on a flat fell seam.  It is coming, just as soon as I finish browbeating this laptop into behaving – or I throw it out of the 3rd story dormer window.  There is no scanned image of the pattern today either, I will add it when I can.  Here is one I found on Etsy, if you’re in the mood to make one after this!  :)

This is one of those 1960s patterns I’ve had for a while, but not been sure of what to make it in.  Then last week I had a clear out – basically I was looking for something in the fabric cupboard & got distracted with all the pretty fabric I found!  Anyway, in my “leftovers to do something with” box I found a piece of black “batik” cotton.  Originally bought for a pleated skirt years ago, there was enough for “something”.  I put it aside & added to it a few more pieces.  I did think I could do some sort of colour blocking somewhere along the line.

DSC07910-1In the end I decided to stick with the black & find something it would go with.  After raiding the linen box I pulled out this gorgeous black linen.  It is one of those soft, drapey linens, rather than a crisp one.  It hangs beautifully!  I know Belle was worried that this would be too sack-like – I have in the past taken in the seams on 60s dresses for her so there is more waist definition.  But this dress doesn’t need it!

DSC07912-1I used the sewing machine’s “overlock” stitch on this dress.  The linen tends to show bulk though on the right side so I didn’t want anything like a Hong Kong binding, or even a clean finish.  It all needed to stay smooth and simple.  Attaching the yoke to the skirt piece was pretty easy, and to get that point in the centre front all you do is not sew the centre front skirt seam all the way to the top.  Leave the last 1.5cm open, then it’s easier to pivot!

DSC07916-1The centre back seam has the zip.  I chose a centred application here, and as my zip was 5cm shorter than that required I moved it down as far as I could & added a black hook & eye to to the neckline.  I love a neat zip insertion, & horizontal seam on the yoke played ball & lined up well without too much hassle.  It’s all down to pinning well & basting.

I am very pleased with the finished result.  I must see if there is another fabric, or couple of fabrics I can use to make another!  I like the idea of using a stripe, playing with the bias cut cuff.  Then there’s the added bonus of messing with the 4 pieces of the skirt section and those seams….  Piping! a contrast piping along that yoke edge and repeated on the sleeve at the cuff seam..

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As this computer is being more than a royal pain in the behind, this is where I will have to leave you for now.  I will be back to update with more information & photographs soon – promise!

 

Two Little Boys

New York Gold Seal Pattern 1581

New York Gold Seal Pattern 1581

Two little boys are going to be getting a rather cute outfit!  In an attempt to stop all that beautiful fabric I bought last week going straight into the stash boxes, I got stuck straight in on a project that really could have waited another year…  Yup, cute as these shirts are, they won’t be needed for a little while.  Anyway, who cares? Kids grow like weeds, especially those who live in the Southern Hemisphere :)  These are soon to be winging their way to my stepsister-in-law’s twin boys.

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This cute pattern from the 1940s was in a pile of patterns I got from a friend in Illinois.  The moment I saw it I knew I wanted to make something for the boys, but I wanted the right fabric.  Thank goodness for Fabric Affair, they had the perfect stuff for me!  I had bundled everything I’d bought from the show into the washing machine that afternoon, so by the weekend it was all dry & ironed, ready to be cut & sewn.  I pinned the foldline and various intersecting points on these fabrics so that the stripes wouldn’t go too wiggly on me & I’d have an easier time matching the plaid when it came to sew.

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I used a flat fell seam on both shirts, topstitching one with navy blue & the other with turquoise thread.  I went with this finish because sometimes linen can be scratchy on delicate skin.  The seam allowance was only 1cm so it was tricky work folding the fabric, but it pressed beautifully and stayed put when I needed it to.  I will post a tutorial on the flat fell seam finish in a day or two.

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Despite my huge button stash, I didn’t have the right buttons for the fabric.  I went shopping for red or navy buttons for the plaid & white or turquoise for the other one, but came home with brown shell buttons & a handful of orange ones instead!  I actually rather like how it ended up, the orange makes the turquoise shirt look more playful.

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The pattern was easy to use, only one piece was missing for the shirt.  There is supposed to be a separate cuff piece for the sleeves, which has gone walkies.  I cut a 5.5cm wide strip on the bias for the red & blue shirt to add a bit of pizzazz.  For the turquoise shirt I just turned up a deep hem & topstitched it in place.  I think it’s nice to have different finishes, although the boys are twins, even at 2 they’ll have their own personalities, so they don’t need the same clothes!

Different cuff details

Different cuff details

There was only one disappointment in the whole thing.  I hadn’t checked before setting off fabric shopping that all the pieces were in the envelope.  So when it came to tracing & cutting I got a shock.  No little dungarees in the envelope any more!  Not a huge problem, I’m pretty sure that in my 20 year collection of Burda magazines I’ll be able to find a suitable pattern.  But I really wanted the whole thing to be vintage.  Ah well, maybe I’ll keep my eyes peeled on Etsy or eBay instead.

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So, as this pattern is from the 40s, I’m making it one of my entries for Rochelle’s Sew for Victory 2.0!  Now to finish a lovely dress in that gorgeous peony print I used in the last dress – another 1940s pattern – another Sew for Victory 2.0 project!  :)

ps, apologies for the huge photographs, WordPress used to allow me to make them a little smaller, but it seems they’ve removed that feature..

 

What Happens When I go Fabric Shopping

I went to the annual Sewing for Pleasure show at the NEC in Birmingham this Thursday with one of my students/friends.  I had a wishlist of sorts for fabric & a definite shopping list for interfacing.  This pile is the result (minus the interfacing).

A tempting pile of fabric goodness

A tempting pile of fabric goodness

The first day of an exhibition is always the best one, the stalls are still fully stocked & you get first pick of all the loverly goodies!  Our first stop was Gill Arnold for interfacing.  I had run down to the smallest, scrattiest scraps so was desperate for whole metres of the fabulous interfacings she sells.  Leaving her stall with £60 of interfacing made me ridiculously happy!  How excited should someone be when all they’ve bought is interfacing??

Gill Arnold's stand

Gill Arnold’s stand

Then we made a run for Rosenberg’s.  The problem with knowing that a particular stand is guaranteed to have the sort of fabric that would bring out the worst in any fabric hoarder is that that’s the place we all want to be!  So elbowing your way through a crowd 5 people deep takes determination.  Unfortunately, it also takes bad manners, something not lacking in quite a few of my fellow shoppers….  We decided to move on to other stands & come back…

Rosenberg's

Rosenberg’s

Apologies for the blurred photo, I was being run down by a mobility scooter!

Anyhow, we enjoyed hunting down goodies to fill our bags, one of the surprise finds of the day was Fabric Affair.  We almost missed this one, only a need for the cloakroom brought it to our attention! Location…  They’d travelled from Ireland with the most amazingly soft tweeds & linens.  I thoroughly expected the tweed to be prickly like Harris tweed, so was pleasantly surprised when it turned out to be as soft as mohair!

Fabric Affair with Irish tweed & linen

Fabric Affair with Irish tweed & linen

Those patchwork quilts at the back of the stand – they’re tweed!…  Go to their site, buy their stuff, it’s great!  :)

For those of you who like indie patterns, we found a company based in Lyme Regis, Dorset.  Sew La Di Da have created a range of vintage inspired dress patterns & I love their packaging!  If you’re close enough, you can attend sewing classes at the studio.   Well worth a visit.

Sew La Di Da vintage inspired dresses in calico on the stand

Sew La Di Da vintage inspired dresses in calico on the stand

And the packaging of the patterns…

Sew La Di Da pattern packaging

Sew La Di Da pattern packaging

Another new-to-me stand was Doughty’s.  They had the usual patchwork fabric offerings and some soft furnishing stuff – but what really caught my eye was their huge stock of ex-Paul Smith shirtings.  I needed a drool bucket.  I forgot to take a photo of their stand in my weakness, but rest assured, they have just about every colour you’d want for a man’s shirt.  Not only cotton shirtings, but cotton canvas also, perfect for a summer jacket – or some trousers…

So what did I get….  Well, I wanted some linen for a bolero, fabric to make a cute little boy’s 1940s dungarees & shirt, something gorgeously different for a 50s dress & something for shirts/blouses for me & a fabric for a cropped jacket for Belle.  In the end I think I did ok, see what you think.

Small check cotton canvas for a cropped jacket

Small check cotton canvas for a cropped jacket

Plaid & checked Irish linen with pale denim for vintage boy’s outfit

2.5 metres of checked pure Irish linen from Fabric Affair for a 50's dress

2.5 metres of checked pure Irish linen from Fabric Affair for a 50′s dress

Cotton poplin for a sleeveless blouse & linen for a bolero from Rosenberg's

Cotton poplin for a sleeveless blouse & linen for a bolero from Rosenberg’s

This linen is fabulous & I bought it to make a bolero to go with a 40s dress I want to make, but managed to convert yards to metres incorrectly & bought too little!  Boo!!

ex-Paul Smith shirtings from Doughty's

ex-Paul Smith shirtings from Doughty’s

An amazing cotton lawn for a friend.

An amazing cotton lawn for a friend.

So now I need to get cracking on the sewing!  None of this needs to find its way into my stash boxes….

Pretty Peony Frock

Simplicity 4982 from the early 1960s

Simplicity 4982 from the early 1960s

This is one of the patterns from my haul in Tewksbury.  I love the shape of the skirt & the pleats.  In addition to the pile of patterns, I also bought a length of cotton floral print.  You’d have caught glimpses of it in my previous post about the seam finish.  The pattern repeat was quite large, so to save fabric I didn’t go overboard on trying to match everything.  I’m hoping to squeeze out 1 or 2 more dresses from this stuff!

Simplicity 4982 in peony print cotton

Simplicity 4982 in peony print cotton

I had intended this dress to go into my Etsy shop, but Belle has had other plans for it!  She loves it!  The dress, the print…  I knew it would look fabulous, but it looks even better on her than I thought it would!

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Definitely one to make again, the pattern is quick to run up.  This version has the short kimono sleeves, so perhaps next time I’ll do the “cap” instead.  This is one of those dresses that would look brilliant in a pretty cotton print or a more sophisticated fabric for a night out.  A bit like the By Hand London dresses, it could have a lot of different incarnations.

DSC07726-1I used a simple centred zip application, if I’d realised Belle would want to steal it from me, I’d have put in an invisible zip instead.  So, as mentioned before, all the seams were pinked, I used bias tape to finish the sleeve hems as well as to bind the hem of the skirt.peony Collage 1I will need to make an underskirt for this one – I had bought the fabric to make a seperate skirt, but wasn’t quite sure how this would hold up against the sun!  Needless to say, it failed the sun test!  If she can possibly wait until after the weekend, she can have this with underskirt to wear to school.  One look at this face tells you how much she loves it…

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I’m off to a big sewing show tomorrow, & I hope I’ll be able to pick up more gorgeous fabric to make another couple of these.

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Seam Finishes – Pinked Seams

As I finished off my previous post, I realised I hadn’t mentioned the seam finishes used.  Now I’m not sure how many people are actually all that interested in the finish, but if you’re going to have a good looking, long lasting garment, the seam finish is pretty important.  I usually have a fairly good idea of which finish I will be using on each fabric & pattern, but sometimes there could be a few to choose from.

A couple of months ago, Rochelle admitted she hated pinked seams, although she used them a fair bit, and wanted to try out other finishes on her vintage makes.  Now I don’t use this finish on my “normal” stuff, but I think it has its place in the vintage world.  It is one of the simplest and easiest finishes to use & you don’t need to think too much about how it will impact on the construction.  All you do need to think of is the type of fabric you’re using.  I wouldn’t use it on silk, for example!  It is great for use on cottons that have too much bulk for a clean finish or French seam.  I’ve used it in my current project, a medium weight cotton in an early 1960s dress.

Here’s how I get a good result.  First, I sew the seam – sounds obvious, but you have to start somewhere!!  Step two is to sew a straight stitch about 5mm from the edge of the fabric within the seam allowance.

Steps 1 & 2 for a pinked seam

Steps 1 & 2 for a pinked seam

Now you get out the pinking shears and cut along the edge, not cutting though the line of stitching.  The line is there for a guide, so you keep your trimming fairly straight, but it serves a second purpose of not allowing any fraying to go past it & potentially into your seam.

Pinked seam

Pinked seam

As with all seam finishes, the pinked seam has its place.  If this fabric had been lighter & finer, I’d have used a clean finish or even a French seam.  On a blouse or shirt I may have considered a flat fell.  I might post a couple of these mini tutorials so you can see & possibly use the great variety of options there are!

The completed seam.

The completed seam.

Now I need to finish off some hand sewing on this cute dress so it can be photographed in the sunshine later – yay for sun!  Also, “Sew for Victory 2.0” has been announced, who’s in??

Lucky Number Three

1953 Butterick 8097

1953 Butterick 8097

I’ve made it again!  This Butterick pattern is really paying for its keep quite well!  It is so quick to make I really should use it more often.  This time I’ve used the sleeveless version.  I had bought a selection of fabrics from the local charity shop for a grand total of just over £3 a few weeks ago, one piece I knew I’d be using pretty quickly, and I already knew the pattern I wanted!

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This piece is a viscose/cotton blend crinkle, dark navy blue with white & grey diamond print.  It had been used before and so was never going to be enough for anything with sleeves.  The fabric has the most amazing drape which works so well with the gathers in the back above the shoulder blades.  The armholes are finished with self bias strips hand stitched to the inside.   The buttons were from my stash & match the colouring of the print perfectly!  Belle was so happy with this one that she wore it to school on Friday, I’d only finished it on Thursday afternoon!  It was perfect timing, this week has been sunny (once the fog had lifted) and warm.

Butterick 8097 in navy print viscose/cotton

Butterick 8097 in navy print viscose/cotton

 

The back gathers softly into the yoke

The back gathers softly into the yoke

Apologies for the slight wrinkling – that’s what happens after a day of wear at school.

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So the only version of this I have yet to make is the short sleeves with cuffs.  Perhaps after next week’s visit to the NEC I will have found the perfect fabric for that too!

 

Spotty boat-neck Blouse

1956 Simplicity 1727

1956 Simplicity 1727

Another vintage pattern made up!  I’ve been a bit slow on the vintage makes this year.  I really needed to make more stuff for myself, so have neglected this a bit.  Not that I didn’t stop looking – or buying, as my last post shows!

So, I did a version of 2 of these options.  I love the wide collar of view 4, but wasn’t keen on the casing & tie on the bottom.  I also love the three quarter sleeves with 3 little darts at the elbow.  I used view 3 for the sleeves & neckline, the collar from 4 and the length and dart shaping from 1.  Simples. ;)

1956 Simplicity 1727 in blue & white spot cotton

1956 Simplicity 1727 in blue & white spot cotton

I had just enough of this cute spot cotton to cut it all out.  Belle loves it, but in a different fabric for her.  It’ll have to go on the long list of things I still need to make!  That neckline is even better in real life than in the picture.  There are 4 waist darts in total on the front, plus underarm darts.  These all mean there is a great shape in the blouse, it has quite an elongating effect!

Simplicity 1712  the obligatory back shot

Simplicity 1712 the obligatory back shot

A shaped back seam and a further 4 darts in the back mean no bagginess here either.  The pattern made up really easily, there is no fussiness so it’s quick too!  I used French seams throughout, double turned the hem & faced the sleeve hems with contrast white bias binding.

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I wonder what fabric Belle would prefer hers to be in, if she’s not that keen on the spots?  It’s not like she’ll be short of choices if she looks in my fabric stash!  This one will be in my Etsy shop later today, while I carry on with my cataloguing of my vintage patterns.

I read a post over the weekend by Charity of The Daring Domestic, where she had recently downloaded Evernote and was singing its praises. I desperately needed a method of recording my patterns that didn’t involve a notebook & lots of scribbling.  This is much more visual – I can put it on my phone (yes, there’s even an app my useless Windows phone actually has!) so I can have instant access, whenever I need it!  I have started the long process of scanning front & back pattern envelopes, noting the sizes, condition of the patterns etc.  It’s going to be a long haul, but already I’m really happy with it.  Especially if it means I get to spend some time with these gorgeous things, instead of them being permanently in boxes.  That’s the next thing to sort though.  I really do need to make proper storage for my treasures.

What, if any, system do you use for keeping track of your patterns (& fabric, if you’re that organised) and how do you store yours?

Vintage Pattern Shopping Spree

Tewksbury Abbey in the Spring

Tewksbury Abbey in the Spring

Ahh, look at that.  Nothing prettier than the English countryside when the sun comes out, especially if it’s shining on such a fabulous piece of architecture.  This is Tewksbury Abbey.  And no, I didn’t go to see the church, or even the town with its fair share of half-timbered buildings.

Tewksbury

Tewksbury

No – I went hunting for vintage patterns.  A good friend had given me a pretty vintage pattern & a length of fabric for my birthday, along with the card for a vintage shop in Tewksbury called Replay.    Saturday had dawned, clear of clouds & that constant rain, so I conned Husband into going for a drive on “such a pretty, sunny day”.  When he asked, “Where do you want to drive to?” I had the perfect answer!

Apparently Replay has been going in various guises since 1987.  So if you’re in the Gloucestershire area & are into vintage, you probably already know all there is to know about the place.  Anyway, it’s a pretty small shop in a rather lovely building.  It’s PACKED with stuff all vying for your attention.  The worst offenders were all the sparkly small items – brooches, necklaces…..  I had to keep calm.  I was hunting patterns!

And I found them.  I had to be ruthless, they were so helpless, so easy to pick up.  But I narrowed down the selection to the strongest contenders.  Would you like to see my trophies?

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These are the larger sizes, bust 40 & 42

The coats here were what caught my eye.  I have none in my collection in these sizes, and quite stylish too.  Then that dress pattern – oh!  So pretty!  I don’t know much about LeRoy patterns, anyone got some info?

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The 38′s

There are so many things I like about these!  The McCall’s coat dress is probably my favourite.  I love that they call it a dress, but also show it as a coat too.  The French darts & Neru collar are bonus details that make it different.  The Style dress pattern is a great all-rounder, & everyone needs a mac-style coat, right?

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Some 70s chic & a 60s coat

I really like the Simplicity dress pattern, I know Belle would like that made up.  The Style coat came without any instructions or fabric requirements, but I like the style-lines.  I’d make it a little more fitting than it shows, but it has good bones.  The Maudella has a cool sleeveless blouse, love the tie!

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Always so many good patterns in the 34 bust range!

Three patterns from the 60s & one from the 50s.  Again, that is a LeRoy pattern.  How gorgeous is that dress!?  I bought it purely for the back!!  Then we have the Simplicity suit pattern – I love that jacket.  The other dress patterns couldn’t be more different, given they are both from the 60s.  I can see the Butterick in a beautiful silk, & the Simplicity has a passing resemblance to now popular Emery pattern.

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The last of my drool-pile!  I love that Butterick pattern with the deep pleat running from the princess seams.  The cape pattern is going to be used a lot!  The cigarette pants are included.  The Vogue pattern is destined for my friend in America who sends me all sorts of stunning patterns – I love the collar, and much prefer it with a belt than left loose.

So, to make room for these, I needed to make a little room.  So I have reluctantly chosen a couple of my hoard to sell.

Vintage patterns for sale

Vintage patterns for sale

  1. Simplicity 2081 dated 1947, bust 42.    This pattern is factory folded, uncut.  I’m quite amazed that it’s never been used!  The envelope is in pretty good condition, only a little bumped on the corners, no rips or tears & the flap is intact.  The bodice, styled with soft pleats at the front waistline and gathers at the back, features a collar that is cut in one with the bodice front.  A shoulder yoke releases easy bodice fullness.  Front pleats enhance the skirt which joins the bodice at the natural waistline.  Topstitching accents the fly-front opening and a purchased or self belt may be used.  In Style 1 the three quarter sleeve is gathered into a cuffed band.  The short sleeve of Style 2 has a narrow cuff that is cut in one with the sleeve.  Embroidery trims the dress – transfer included.
  2. Simplicity 4775 dated 1943, bust 38.  Currently reservedSOLD
  3. Simplicity 2098 dated 1947, bust 34.  Currently reserved.  SOLD
  4. SOLD
  5. Simplicity 4407 dated 1942, bust 42.  This pattern is factory folded, uncut.  Women’s slack suit.  The slacks are seamed at the sides and the waistline is fitted with small pleats.  The jacket is dart fitted through the waistline and seamed down the centre back.  Neckline may be finished with a notched collar or may remain collarless.  Welt pockets trim the front.  Choice of long or short sleeves.
  6. Simplicity 2232 dated 1947, bust 36.  The coat is fitted with darts at the front shoulder and the back yoke releases an easy flare.  A pointed collar and flap pockets finish the coat.  the sleeve, cut in two sections, is faced at the lower edge and folds back to form a cuff.  Topstitching is used for trimming.  The coat is lined and interlined.  Style 1 is a full length coat.  In Style 2 the coat is three-quarter length.

If any of these look tempting to you, leave me a comment.  :)

And if you’re in the Tewksbury area, pop into Replay on Church street!

Sweet as Candy

Simplicity 2195

Simplicity 2195

It’s been a while, but I finally have a candy pink gingham blouse to show off.  I wish I had this in a smaller size because Belle really wanted one of her own!  Using view 2 of this oh-so-cute Simplicity pattern, I had a small print (not weave) pink & white gingham in my stash that was just a perfect match &  I only just got it all in too!

Once again, the dart tucks on the front & back make the blouse fit so well, but my favourite part of this pattern is the collar.   I love the curve of the revers.  Sometimes it’s the little things that count!

Topstitched front stand & cute curved revers

Topstitched front stand & cute curved revers

I used flat fell seams this time, they seemed to suit the slightly “sporty” look of this shirt.  I’d have loved to have done the pocket or embroidery, but I only just had enough fabric to squeeze the pattern out, & the embroidered initials really need to belong to the person whose shirt it is. So there you go – I’ll have to look out for a smaller size on Etsy, or draft one for Belle.

Back shoulder yoke

Back shoulder yoke

The pattern itself is really easy to follow & make up.  The sleeve is inserted as a men’s shirt, not as a set-in sleeve, & then it’s topstitched onto the body of the shirt.  This could be the answer to those sewists who are scared of setting in sleeves…

Simplicity 2195 in pink & white gingham cotton

Simplicity 2195 in pink & white gingham cotton

I’m also loving those big cuffs – and they aren’t fake ones this time either.  The dart combined with the shaped side seam & dart tucks at the hip give this shirt a great shape & allow for good movement.  My model unfortunately was not moving – it was rather cold when I bribed her with chocolate cake to stand outdoors for me!

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I love this shirt with jeans, I can just see it with a pair of capri pants & converses in the summer!  Oh, please come quickly summer, we need warmth!

I really liked this pattern, so intend to make another, with maybe just enough time to fit it in before the end of the month & the end of the Sewcialist’s Sew Blue February.  I have the prettiest blue & ecru floral print in my stash that would look dead cute in this pattern.  In the meantime I can chalk this up as another piece of fabric busted from the stash, whoop!  It’s also for sale in my Etsy shop now, so sad that it fits neither me nor Belle.  Ah well, another pattern sewn up, only 200 more to go..  I suppose I should have numbered them as I went along.  Obviously I have very poor organisational skills!