Two Little Boys

New York Gold Seal Pattern 1581

New York Gold Seal Pattern 1581

Two little boys are going to be getting a rather cute outfit!  In an attempt to stop all that beautiful fabric I bought last week going straight into the stash boxes, I got stuck straight in on a project that really could have waited another year…  Yup, cute as these shirts are, they won’t be needed for a little while.  Anyway, who cares? Kids grow like weeds, especially those who live in the Southern Hemisphere 🙂  These are soon to be winging their way to my stepsister-in-law’s twin boys.

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This cute pattern from the 1940s was in a pile of patterns I got from a friend in Illinois.  The moment I saw it I knew I wanted to make something for the boys, but I wanted the right fabric.  Thank goodness for Fabric Affair, they had the perfect stuff for me!  I had bundled everything I’d bought from the show into the washing machine that afternoon, so by the weekend it was all dry & ironed, ready to be cut & sewn.  I pinned the foldline and various intersecting points on these fabrics so that the stripes wouldn’t go too wiggly on me & I’d have an easier time matching the plaid when it came to sew.

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I used a flat fell seam on both shirts, topstitching one with navy blue & the other with turquoise thread.  I went with this finish because sometimes linen can be scratchy on delicate skin.  The seam allowance was only 1cm so it was tricky work folding the fabric, but it pressed beautifully and stayed put when I needed it to.  I will post a tutorial on the flat fell seam finish in a day or two.

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Despite my huge button stash, I didn’t have the right buttons for the fabric.  I went shopping for red or navy buttons for the plaid & white or turquoise for the other one, but came home with brown shell buttons & a handful of orange ones instead!  I actually rather like how it ended up, the orange makes the turquoise shirt look more playful.

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The pattern was easy to use, only one piece was missing for the shirt.  There is supposed to be a separate cuff piece for the sleeves, which has gone walkies.  I cut a 5.5cm wide strip on the bias for the red & blue shirt to add a bit of pizzazz.  For the turquoise shirt I just turned up a deep hem & topstitched it in place.  I think it’s nice to have different finishes, although the boys are twins, even at 2 they’ll have their own personalities, so they don’t need the same clothes!

Different cuff details

Different cuff details

There was only one disappointment in the whole thing.  I hadn’t checked before setting off fabric shopping that all the pieces were in the envelope.  So when it came to tracing & cutting I got a shock.  No little dungarees in the envelope any more!  Not a huge problem, I’m pretty sure that in my 20 year collection of Burda magazines I’ll be able to find a suitable pattern.  But I really wanted the whole thing to be vintage.  Ah well, maybe I’ll keep my eyes peeled on Etsy or eBay instead.

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So, as this pattern is from the 40s, I’m making it one of my entries for Rochelle’s Sew for Victory 2.0!  Now to finish a lovely dress in that gorgeous peony print I used in the last dress – another 1940s pattern – another Sew for Victory 2.0 project!  🙂

ps, apologies for the huge photographs, WordPress used to allow me to make them a little smaller, but it seems they’ve removed that feature..

 

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5 responses to “Two Little Boys

    • I know! I’ve looked for another on Etsy & eBay, but there aren’t any at the moment. Looks like it’ll have to be a Burda pattern after all.

  1. Pingback: Going on an Elephant Safari | Vintage Belle·

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